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Capstone EFL Portfolio

dc.contributor.authorJingjing, Meng
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-03T18:06:17Z
dc.date.available2019-05-03T18:06:17Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1803/9469
dc.descriptionTeaching and Learning Department capstone project This EFL portfolio is a final reflection of what I have learnt in the two-year master’s study in the English Language Learner program at Peabody College, Vanderbilt University. In the past two years, I finished ten classes, four practicums and one independent study. This portfolio helps me to link up my teaching philosophy, my actual learning on theories, my assignments that I finished and my future teaching implications. This portfolio contains three sections: philosophy of teaching, artifact analysis and implications and future considerations. My philosophy of teaching expands four categories: students and their communities, the curriculum, sociocultural, psychological and political variables to facilitate English learning, and partnerships and advocacy. In the artifact analysis, I provide five artifacts from different class assignments as supporting evidence for my understanding of the following six TESOL domains: identity and context, learning, instructing, planning, content and assessing. The last part of the implications goes over the teaching identity I want to set up in my future teaching, the challenges that I consider I might face and a simple overview of how to continue improving myself as a language teacher.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis portfolio is a final reflection of what I have learnt in my two-year master study in the English Language Learners program at Peabody College, Vanderbilt University. In the past two years, I finished ten classes, four practicums and one independent study. This portfolio helps me to link up my teaching philosophy, my actual learning on theories, my assignments that I finished and my future teaching implications. This portfolio contains three sections: philosophy of teaching, artifact analysis and implications and future considerations. My philosophy of teaching expands under four categories: students and their communities, the curriculum, sociocultural, psychological and political variables to facilitate English learning, and partnerships and advocacy. In the artifact analysis, I provide five artifacts from different class assignments as supporting evidence for my understanding of four professional knowledge areas: the learner, learning context, curriculum, and assessment.The last implication section goes over the teaching identity I want to set up in my future teaching, the challenges that I consider I might face and a simple overview of how to continue improving myself as a language teacher.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherVanderbilt University. Peabody Collegeen_US
dc.subjectEnglish language learners, TESOL, EFL, Language teachingen_US
dc.subject.lcshEducationen_US
dc.titleCapstone EFL Portfolioen_US
dc.typeCapstoneen_US
dc.description.collegePeabody College of Education and Human Developmenten_US
dc.description.schoolVanderbilt Universityen_US
dc.description.departmentDepartment of Teaching and Learningen_US


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