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Developing Resilience: Acknowledging Racial and Systemic Issues

dc.contributor.advisorSelf, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Earl
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-04T16:15:47Z
dc.date.available2018-05-04T16:15:47Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1803/8841
dc.descriptionTeaching and Learning Department Capstone Project. Capstone Seminar Course #7992 Professor Elizabeth Selfen_US
dc.description.abstractResilience is a trait which allows individuals to become “elastic” or “bounce back” from adverse situations. Resilience has become a topic for kids in urban context and how they handle harsh environments. Though resilience is needed and can help with adversity, research has failed to identify its relationship to systemic disparities and other racial l issues. In this paper, I will challenge the way we view “resilience” (Werner, 2005) for Black children enrolled in elementary in urban context through the lens of Critical Race Theory. I will closely examine past research on student resilience in urban school contexts and pay particular attention to studies that do not give consideration to racial and systemic issues that can drastically affect the education of elementary children in urban environment.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherVanderbilt University. Peabody Collegeen_US
dc.subjectSystemic Issuesen_US
dc.subjectDeveloping Resilienceen_US
dc.subjectUrban Contexten_US
dc.subjectElementaryen_US
dc.subject.lcshRacismen_US
dc.subject.lcshCritical race theoryen_US
dc.titleDeveloping Resilience: Acknowledging Racial and Systemic Issuesen_US
dc.typeCapstoneen_US
dc.description.collegePeabody College of Education and Human Developmenten_US
dc.description.departmentDepartment of Teaching and Learningen_US


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