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Thematic Cartography For Social Reform In Chicago, 1894-1923

dc.contributor.authorSchastok, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-09T16:46:19Z
dc.date.available2016-09-09T16:46:19Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationSchastok, Rachel. "Thematic Cartography For Social Reform In Chicago, 1894-1923." Vanderbilt Historical Review 1.2 (2016): 62-68.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1803/8365
dc.description.abstractA historiographical analysis of thematic mapping in turn-of-the-century Chicago reveals the role of cartography as a highly politicized method for sorting and labeling urban populations. Progressive Era reformers and sociologists created maps that fixed transient and shifting populations of various ethnic and socioeconomic groups deemed undesirable. Such urban mapping projects demonstrate the application of cartography's ostensible objectivity to justify moral and political judgments about urban populations.en_US
dc.publisherVanderbilt University, Department of Historyen_US
dc.titleThematic Cartography For Social Reform In Chicago, 1894-1923en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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    Digital archive collection of the Vanderbilt Historical Review, an undergraduate research journal in History.

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