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Ode to Peace or Prelude to Militarism?: The Opening Ceremonies of the 1936 Berlin Olympics as Political Theater

dc.contributor.authorSmith, Samuel D.
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-09T16:30:40Z
dc.date.available2016-09-09T16:30:40Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationSmith, Samuel D. "Ode to Peace or Prelude to Militarism?: The Opening Ceremonies of the 1936 Berlin Olympics as Political Theater." Vanderbilt Historical Review 1.1 (2016): 28-33.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1803/8358
dc.description.abstractWhen Nazi leadership ultimately embraced the notion of hosting the 1936 Summer Olympic Games in Berlin, the decision entailed an undertaking to which an inherently militaristic society would seem ill-suited: orchestrating an opening ceremony, a celebration grounded in the principles of peace and harmony, that could withstand the scrutiny of a leery global audience. Through a dynamic approach that steeped the ceremony's routine proceedings in rich symbolic gestures, the Nazis' audition on the international stage generally succeeded in establishing an outwardly benign atmosphere. However, a thorough appraisal reveals that the regime could not bring itself to fully suppress its martial disposition, which consequentially colored a number of the day's events.en_US
dc.publisherVanderbilt University, Department of Historyen_US
dc.titleOde to Peace or Prelude to Militarism?: The Opening Ceremonies of the 1936 Berlin Olympics as Political Theateren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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    Digital archive collection of the Vanderbilt Historical Review, an undergraduate research journal in History.

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