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Judging by Heuristic: Cognitive Illusions in Judicial Decision Making

dc.contributor.authorGuthrie, Chris
dc.contributor.authorRachlinski, Jeffrey John
dc.contributor.authorWistrich, Andrew J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-09T17:48:57Z
dc.date.available2015-04-09T17:48:57Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citation86 Judicature 44 (2002)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1803/6935
dc.descriptionarticle published in law journalen_US
dc.description.abstractThe institutional legitmacy of the judiciary depends on the quality of the judgments that judges make. Even the most talented and dedicated judges surely make occasional mistakes, but the public expects judges to avoid making systematic errors that favor particular parties or writing opinions that embed these mistakes into the substantive law. Psychological research on human judgment, however, suggests that this expectation might be unrealistic.en_US
dc.format.extent1 PDF (8 pages)en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJudicatureen_US
dc.subjectCognitive illusionsen_US
dc.subjectCognitive biasen_US
dc.subjectHeuristicsen_US
dc.subjectJudicial decision makingen_US
dc.subject.lcshJudicial processen_US
dc.subject.lcshHeuristicen_US
dc.subject.lcshJudges -- Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.lcshJudicial erroren_US
dc.subject.lcshDecision making -- Psychological aspectsen_US
dc.subject.lcshJudgmentsen_US
dc.titleJudging by Heuristic: Cognitive Illusions in Judicial Decision Makingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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