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An Empirically Based Comparison of American and European Regulatory Approaches to Police Investigation

dc.contributor.authorSlobogin, Christopher, 1951-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-08T17:10:15Z
dc.date.available2014-08-08T17:10:15Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citation22 Mich. J. Int'l L. 423 (2001)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1803/6649
dc.description.abstractThis article takes a comparative and empirical look at two of the most significant methods of police investigation: searches for and seizures of tangible evidence and interrogation of suspects. It first compares American doctrine regulating these investigative tools with the analogous rules predominant in Europe (specifically, England, France and Germany). It then discusses research on the American system that sheds light on the relative advantages and disadvantages of the two regulatory systems. More often than not, the existing data call into question preconceived notions of what "works." In particular, American reverence for search warrants, the exclusionary rule, and "Miranda" warnings may be based on significant misperceptions about the effect of these aspects of American criminal procedure. This conclusion suggests some possible hybrid approaches to police regulation that are presented in the final section of the article.en_US
dc.format.extent1 PDF (35 pages)en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMichigan Journal of International Lawen_US
dc.subject.lcshCriminal investigation -- Law and legislationen_US
dc.subject.lcshSearches and seizuresen_US
dc.titleAn Empirically Based Comparison of American and European Regulatory Approaches to Police Investigationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.ssrn-urihttp://ssrn.com/abstract=289410


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