Now showing items 1323-1342 of 1362

    • Maroney, Terry A. (Boston College Law Review, 2020)
      Judicial temperament is simultaneously the thing we think all judges must have and the thing that no one can quite put a finger on. Extant accounts are scattered and thin, and either present a laundry list of desirable ...
    • Sherry, Suzanna (Perspectives on Politics, 2004)
      The authors of this fascinating study modestly disclaim its significance, yet suggest that the results prove their model a success. As a legal expert, I have a rather different perspective on the results. I look at the ...
    • Cheng, Edward K. (University of Pennsylvania Law Review, 2012)
      In many mass tort cases, separately trying all individual claims is impractical, and thus a number of trial courts and commentators have explored the use of statistical sampling as a way of efficiently processing claims. ...
    • King, Nancy J.; Soule, David A.; Steen, Sara; Weidner, Robert R. (Columbia Law Review, 2005)
      The research reported in this Essay examines process discounts-differences in sentences imposed for the same offense, depending upon whether the conviction was by jury trial, bench trial, or guilty plea-in five states that ...
    • Thomas, Randall S., 1955-; Rasmussen, Robert K. (Vanderbilt Law Review, 2001)
      Recent empirical work has demonstrated that large, publicly held firms tend to file for bankruptcy in Delaware. In our previous work, we have documented this trend, and argued that it may be efficient for prepackaged ...
    • Slobogin, Christopher; Hazel, James W. (Cornell Journal of Law & Public Policy, 2018)
      Direct-to-consumer genetic testing (DTC-GT) companies have proliferated in the past several years. Based on an analysis of genetic material submitted by consumers, these companies offer a wide array of services, ranging ...
    • Ruhl, J. B. (N.Y.U. Environmental Law Journal, 1998)
      This article comprehensively examines the history and content of the numerous administrative reforms of the Endangered Species Act program carried out under the tenure of Department of the Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt. ...
    • Hersch, Joni; Meyers, Erin E. (Marquette Law Review, 2019)
      Despite the fact that women are leaving the practice of law at alarmingly high rates, most previous research finds no evidence of gender differences in job satisfaction among lawyers. This Article uses nationally representative ...
    • Maroney, Terry A. (Texas Law Review, 2015)
      In "Heart Versus Head," Rachlinski, Guthrie, and Wistrich present experimental findings suggesting that judges sometimes rule on the basis of emotion rather than reason. Though there is much of value in their findings, ...
    • Fitzpatrick, Brian T. (Vanderbilt Law Review, 2020)
      In Professor Redish's review of my new book, The Conservative Case for Class Actions, he argues that liberals should oppose the class action because the cy pres doctrine used to distribute settlement money is democratically ...
    • Slobogin, Christopher (Iowa Law Review Bulletin, 2012)
      effrey Bellin’s article, Crime Severity Distinctions and the Fourth Amendment: Reassessing Reasonableness in a Changing World, argues that the severity of the crime under investigation ought to be taken into account ...
    • Newton, Michael A., 1962-; Kuhlman, Casey (Netherlands Yearbook of International Law, 2010)
      Commanders are the critical path enabling the formation and employment of any fighting organization. By extension, their units are most militarily effective where they are governed by adequate control mechanisms. The classic ...
    • Schlunk, Herwig J. (Mississippi Law Journal, 2009)
      Some states (like Florida and Texas) collect retail sales taxes but no income taxes; one state (Oregon) collects income taxes but no retail sales taxes; most states collect both. This paper examines the decision of a state ...
    • Slobogin, Christopher, 1951- (University of Illinois Law Review, 1999)
      This article makes the case against the exclusionary rule from a "liberal" perspective. Moving beyond the inconclusive empirical data on the efficacy of the rule, it uses behavioral and motivational theory to demonstrate ...
    • Viscusi, W. Kip (The Georgetown Law Journal, 1998)
      My analysis of punitive damages in environmental and products liability cases concludes that these awards impose substantial costs on society, and that abolishing punitive damages would improve social welfare. The two ...
    • Sherry, Suzanna (Green Bag, 2013)
      Too much of a good thing can be bad, and democracy is no exception. In the United States, the antidote to what the drafters of the Constitution called “the excess of democracy” is judicial review. Lately, however, judicial ...
    • Serkin, Christopher (Vanderbilt Law Review, 2020)
      Zoning is the quintessential wicked problem. Professors Rittel and Webber, writing in the 1970s, identified as "wicked" those problems that technocratic expertise cannot necessarily solve.' Wicked problems arise when the ...
    • Cheng, Edward K. (Michigan Law Review, 2009)
      Professor Ian Ayres, in his new book, Super Crunchers, details the brave new world of statistical prediction and how it has already begun to affect our lives. For years, academic researchers have known about the considerable ...
    • Edelman, Paul H.; Thomas, Randall S.; Jiang, Wei (Texas Law Review, 2019)
      Dual-class voting systems have been widely employed in recent initial public offerings by large tech companies, but have been roundly condemned by institutional investors and the S&P 500. As an alternative, commentators ...
    • Edelman, Paul L.; Jiang, W.; Thomas, Randall S. (Texas Law Review, 2019)
      Dual-class voting systems have been widely employed in recent initial public offerings by large tech companies but have been roundly condemned by institutional investors and the S&P 500. As an alternative, commentators ...