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Public Health Importance of Invasive Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Infections: Surveillance in 8 US Counties, 2016

dc.contributor.authorJackson, Kelly A.
dc.contributor.authorGokhale, Runa H.
dc.contributor.authorNadle, Joelle
dc.contributor.authorRay, Susan M.
dc.contributor.authorDumyati, Ghinwa
dc.contributor.authorSchaffner, William
dc.contributor.authorHam, David C.
dc.contributor.authorMagill, Shelley S.
dc.contributor.authorLynfield, Ruth
dc.contributor.authorSee, Isaac
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-13T03:40:04Z
dc.date.available2020-11-13T03:40:04Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-15
dc.identifier.citationKelly A Jackson, Runa H Gokhale, Joelle Nadle, Susan M Ray, Ghinwa Dumyati, William Schaffner, David C Ham, Shelley S Magill, Ruth Lynfield, Isaac See, Public Health Importance of Invasive Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Infections: Surveillance in 8 US Counties, 2016, Clinical Infectious Diseases, Volume 70, Issue 6, 15 March 2020, Pages 1021–1028, https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciz323en_US
dc.identifier.issn1058-4838
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1803/16298
dc.description.abstractBackground. Public health and infection control prevention and surveillance efforts in the United States have primarily focused on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We describe the public health importance of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) in selected communities. Methods. We analyzed Emerging Infections Program surveillance data for invasive S. aureus (SA) infections (isolated from a normally sterile body site) in 8 counties in 5 states during 2016. Cases were considered healthcare-associated if culture was obtained >3 days after hospital admission; if associated with dialysis, hospitalization, surgery, or long-term care facility (LTCF) residence within 1 year prior; or if a central venous catheter was present <= 2 days prior. Incidence per 100 000 census population was calculated, and a multivariate logistic regression model with random intercepts was used to compare MSSA risk factors with those of MRSA. Results. Invasive MSSA incidence (31.3/100 000) was 1.8 times higher than MRSA (17.5/100 000). Persons with MSSA were more likely than those with MRSA to have no underlying medical conditions (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-3.39) and less likely to have prior hospitalization (aOR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.60-0.82) or LTCF residence (aOR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.29-0.47). MSSA accounted for 59.7% of healthcare-associated cases and 60.1% of deaths. Conclusions. Although MRSA tended to be more closely associated with healthcare exposures, invasive MSSA is a substantial public health problem in the areas studied. Public health and infection control prevention efforts should consider MSSA prevention in addition to MRSA.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a cooperative agreement through the CDC EIP (grants numbers U50CK000201, California; U50CK000196, Georgia; U50CK000204, Minnesota; U50CK000199, New York; and U50CK000198, Tennessee).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherClinical Infectious Diseasesen_US
dc.rightsThis article is a work of the United States government. Such works are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. law and are therefore in the public domain. This act only applies to U.S. domestic copyright as that is the extent of U.S. federal law. The U.S. government asserts that it can still hold the copyright to those works in other countries https://www.usa.gov/government-works
dc.source.urihttps://academic.oup.com/cid/article/70/6/1021/5477381
dc.subjectmethicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureusen_US
dc.subjectMSSAen_US
dc.subjectMSSA burdenen_US
dc.titlePublic Health Importance of Invasive Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Infections: Surveillance in 8 US Counties, 2016en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/cid/ciz323


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