Show simple item record

Male-Female Differences in Hourly Wages: The Role of Human Capital, Working Conditions, and Housework

dc.contributor.authorHersch, Joni, 1956-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-18T15:59:27Z
dc.date.available2015-02-18T15:59:27Z
dc.date.issued1991
dc.identifier.citation44 Indus. & Lab. Rel. Rev. 746 (1991)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1803/6902
dc.descriptionarticle published in law reviewen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study uses a new data set from a 1986 survey of workers to examine simultaneously the wage effects of human capital, household responsibilities, working conditions, and on-the-job training. The analysis suggests that household responsibilities had a negative effect on women's earnings, but the unexplained difference between the earnings of men and women is not greatly reduced by inclusion in the explanatory model of information on either housework or working conditions. The presence of children appears to have had a positive effect on the wages of both men and women.en_US
dc.format.extent1 PDF (15 pages)en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherIndustrial and Labor Relations Reviewen_US
dc.subject.lcshPay equity -- United Statesen_US
dc.subject.lcshWomen -- Wages -- United Statesen_US
dc.subject.lcshHousekeeping -- United Statesen_US
dc.subject.lcshWages and human productivity -- United Statesen_US
dc.titleMale-Female Differences in Hourly Wages: The Role of Human Capital, Working Conditions, and Houseworken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record