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Whose Agony? Whose Ecstasy? The Politics of Deuteronomic Law

dc.contributor.authorKnight, Douglas A., 1943-
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-05T14:36:17Z
dc.date.available2010-01-05T14:36:17Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.citationKnight, Douglas A. "Whose Agony? Whose Ecstasy? The Politics of Deuteronomic Law." Shall Not the Judge of All the Earth Do What Is Right?: Studies on the Nature of God in Tribute to James L. Crenshaw. Eds. David Penchansky and Paul L. Redditt. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns,, 2000. 97-112.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1803/3745
dc.descriptionProfessor Douglas Knight looks at the political and economic structures which were in place when the Hebrew Bible was written. He questions "Whose text is it?" What political and economic goals were the writers of the text trying to attain? What can be learned from a "political and ideological reading of the biblical laws?"en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAccess provided with permission from the publisher, Eisenbraun. © 2000 All Rights Reserved. May not be copied or distributed without prior permission.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherEisenbraunsen_US
dc.subject.lcshBible -- O.T. -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.en_US
dc.subject.lcshJews -- Politics and government -- To 70 A.D.en_US
dc.subject.lcshJews -- Civilization -- To 70 A.D.en_US
dc.subject.lcshJudaism -- History -- Post-exilic period, 586 B.C.-210 A.D.en_US
dc.titleWhose Agony? Whose Ecstasy? The Politics of Deuteronomic Lawen_US
dc.typePostprinten_US
dc.description.schoolDivinity Schoolen_US


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