Now showing items 340-359 of 1133

    • Anderson-Watts, Rachael (Michigan Journal of Gender & Law, 2008)
      Informed consent is a common law concept rooted in the idea that "[e]very human being of adult years and sound mind has a right to determine what shall be done with his own body."' Its aim is to ensure that each patient ...
    • Maroney, Terry A. (Notre Dame Law Review, 2009)
      Recent scientific findings about the developing teen brain have both captured public attention and begun to percolate through legal theory and practice. Indeed, many believe that developmental neuroscience contributed to ...
    • Rossi, Jim, 1965-; Seidenfeld, Mark (Notre Dame Law Review, 2000)
      This essay responds to claims that the "new" nondelegation doctrine, applied by D.C. Circuit Judge Stephen Williams in "American Trucking Association, Inc. v. EPA", 175 F.3d 1027 (D.C. Cir. 1999), advances the rule of law. ...
    • Brandon, Mark E. (Texas Law Review, 1999)
      In recent years, a number of observers of American politics, law, and society have decried what seem to be fundamental shifts in the structure and function of the family. According to some, these shifts, perhaps reinforced ...
    • Ruhl, J.B. (Washington University Journal of Law & Policy, 2002)
      Second in my series of articles on farming and environmental policy, this article examines farmland stewardship rhetoric in light of the reality of extensive agricultural exemptions from environmental regulation.
    • Ruhl, J. B. (Choices, 2008)
      Second in my series of articles on farming and environmental policy, this article examines farmland stewardship rhetoric in light of the reality of extensive agricultural exemptions from environmental regulation.
    • Ruhl, J. B. (Ecology Law Quarterly, 2000)
      Farms are one of the last uncharted frontiers of environmental regulation in the United States. Despite the substantial environmental harms they cause-habitat loss and degradation, soil erosion and sedimentation, water ...
    • Clayton, Ellen Wright (Yale Law Journal, 1978)
      Although genetic disorders have been recognized for centuries, recent advances in the study of human genetics often permit accurate determination of the risk that parents will have genetically defective children.' When ...
    • George, Tracey E.; Yoon, Albert H. (Saint Louis University Law Journal, 2003)
      We applaud Professor Merrill's bold and noteworthy effort to engage in a dialogue with political scientists who study the Supreme Court. He navigates a substantial body of social science scholarship largely ignored by legal ...
    • Tracey, George E., 1967-; Yoon, Albert (Saint Louis University Law Journal, 2003)
      Like Congress, the Supreme Court must delegate a great deal of its work, in this case to lower courts rather than to agencies. Since the Supreme Court is formally at the apex of the judicial pyramid, the Court's decisions ...
    • Rossi, Jim, 1965-; Hutton, Thomas (Thomas G.) (North Carolina Law Review, 2013)
      Federal policies regarding renewable and clean energy often lack clear definition, are incomplete, and are scattered across multiple statutes and agencies. Yet at the same time, recent decisions of both federal agencies ...
    • McKanders, Karla Mari (Wake Forest Journal of Law & Policy, 2013)
      Recently, immigration scholars have focused on the relationship between federal, state, and local governments in regulating immigration to the exclusion of civil rights issues. States and localities assert that they should ...
    • Meyer, Timothy (California Law Review, 2007)
      This article examines how one particular state institution, state attorneys general (SAGs), has operated within a unique set of institutional and political constraints to create state-based regulation with nationwide impact ...
    • Mayeux, Sara; Tani, Karen (American Journal of Legal History, 2016)
      One of the most remarked-upon events of the recent past is the August 2014 death of a black teenager, Michael Brown, at the hands of a white police officer, Darren Wilson, in Ferguson, Missouri. Attention initially focused ...
    • King, Nancy J., 1958-; Noble, Rosevelt L. (Vanderbilt Law Review, 2004)
      Jury sentencing in non-capital cases is one of the least understood procedures in contemporary American criminal justice. This Article looks beyond idealized visions of jury sentencing to examine for the first time how ...
    • Clarke, Jessica (Texas Law Review Online, 2018)
      Gender and the Tournament: Reinventing Antidiscrimination Law in the Age of Inequality, by Naomi Cahn, June Carbone, and Nancy Levit, offers a new account of the glass ceiling, connecting the phenomenon with shoddy corporate ...
    • Hurder, Alex J.; Kay, Susan L.; Bloch, Frank S.; Brooks, Susan L. (Clinical Law Review, 2003)
      Gary Bellow's and Bea Moulton's The Lawyering Process challenged conventional legal education on every front, from the types of material included to the questions asked about law and lawyers. Their book has inspired a ...
    • Williams, David, 1948- (Ohio State Law Journal, 1989)
      The cost of sending a child to college in the United States is rapidly increasing. As a result, the need for families to plan ahead to meet this cost has never been greater. Paramount in making those plans is the consideration ...
    • Ruhl, J. B. (Tulane Maritime Law Journal, 1988)
      The federalism aspect of the United States Supreme Court's admiralty jurisprudence has long been adrift.' No feature of admiralty law illustrates the Court's difficulties in this regard better than maritime wrongful death ...
    • Thomas, Randall S., 1955-; Cotter, James F.; Palmiter, Alan R. (George Washington Law Review, 2013)
      Using voting data from the first year of “say on pay” votes under Dodd-Frank, we look at the patterns of shareholder voting in advisory votes on executive pay. Consistent with the more limited “say on pay” voting before ...